Volcanoes may have greater influence on climate than previously thought

A newly published French study of last year’s eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull Volcano in Iceland suggests that models have underestimated the aerosol formation and hence cooling effect of volcanic eruptions “by 7 to 8 orders of magnitude.”

The Abstract reads:

Volcanic eruptions caused major weather and climatic changes on timescales ranging from hours to centuries in the past. Volcanic particles are injected in the atmosphere both as primary particles rapidly deposited due to their large sizes on time scales of minutes to a few weeks in the troposphere, and secondary particles mainly derived from the oxidation of sulfur dioxide. These particles are responsible for the atmospheric cooling observed at both regional and global scales following large volcanic eruptions. However, large condensational sinks due to preexisting particles within the plume, and unknown nucleation mechanisms under these circumstances make the assumption of new secondary particle formation still uncertain because the phenomenon has never been observed in a volcanic plume. In this work, we report the first observation of nucleation and new secondary particle formation events in a volcanic plume. These measurements were performed at the puy de Dôme atmospheric research station in central France during the Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption in Spring 2010. We show that the nucleation is indeed linked to exceptionally high concentrations of sulfuric acid and present an unusual high particle formation rate. In addition we demonstrate that the binary H2SO4 – H2O nucleation scheme, as it is usually considered in modeling studies, underestimates by 7 to 8 orders of magnitude the observed particle formation rate and, therefore, should not be applied in tropospheric conditions. These results may help to revisit all past simulations of the impact of volcanic eruptions on climate.

Besides primary ash, the researchers say that sulfur dioxide, which oxidizes to sulfuric acid, can act as cloud-forming nuclei that can change the precipitation over a region. The clouds would also partially reflect solar irradiance and therefore contribute to cooling.

UPDATE: New NASA paper says volcanoes primarily responsible for increased SO2:

Recently, the trend, based on ground-based lidar measurements, has been tentatively attributed to an increase of SO(2) entering the stratosphere associated with coal burning in Southeast Asia. However, we demonstrate with these satellite measurements that the observed trend is mainly driven by a series of moderate but increasingly intense volcanic eruptions primarily at tropical latitudes.

See also:

Iceland volcano and its effect on life Photos

Icelandic Volcanoes Geologic Setting

Katla volcano in Iceland may be priming to erupt

Yellowstone Super Volcano

Carbon Dioxide and the Greenhouse Effect

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2 comments

    1. Good question. They are talking about nucleation rates of particles so that large numbers are reasonable. It is also possible that the French authors are using the Greek meaning of order of magnitude, which is linear rather than logarithmic.

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