National Geothermal Data System, free online

The Arizona Geological Survey has announced that the National Geothermal Data System (NDGS) has reached a milestone with data from over one million wells now online and available for free to anyone (http://geothermaldata.org/ ).

The database contains information from a network of academic researchers, private industry, and state and federal agencies. It includes more than 717,000 oil and gas wells, 414,000 water wells, and 9,300 geothermal wells spread broadly across the nation. The data are all free for online viewing or downloading, funded by a number of grants from the US Department of Energy. The system is still growing and AZGS expects there to be an additional 2-3 million wells in the database within a year.

These wells are critical resources to aid in the exploration and development of the nation’s geothermal energy resources. They also represent an invaluable resource for a wide variety of environmental, hydrological, and other natural resource uses.

Each well is accompanied by geographical coordinates, county and state location, well status, total depth, and spud and end-of-drilling dates. Some wells include some or all of the following: bore hole temperature, aqueous geochemistry, drillers log, and geophysical logs – typically porosity, resistivity and temperature logs.

To serve the geothermal exploration and research communities, the NDGS catalog portal provides fast and efficient data discovery via an interactive geographic map tool, ready data access, and analysis. NGDS uses open standards and protocols to encourage developers to build custom applications for accessing and displaying data. The site also includes a frequently asked questions section and tutorials for use of the system. The system can accommodate common GIS applications, including GoogleEarth, ArcGIS Online, ArcGIS Explorer, NREL Geothermal Prospector, Microsoft Layerscape, and the USGS’ National Map Viewer. Give it a try.

See also:

Geothermal potential in Arizona

New Source of Geothermal Energy in Western US.

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